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bordc.org

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Northampton, MA 01060

413-582-0110

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Bill of Rights Defense Committee

Mission: BORDC is a national nonprofit grassroots organization defending the rule of law and rights and liberties challenged by overbroad national security and counter-terrorism policies.

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Campaign Priority Bills and Proposals POPVOX Sentiment Take Action
Campaign 2 H.R. 624
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March 11, 2013

Dear Representative:

We the undersigned organizations write ...

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Join Bill of Rights Defense Committee in opposing H.R. 624

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2003 total users

Oppose

Detailed Legislative Agenda

H.R. 624: CISPA (Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act)

March 11, 2013

Dear Representative:

We the undersigned organizations write in opposition to H.R. 624, the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2013 (CISPA). We are gravely concerned that this bill will allow companies that hold very sensitive and personal information to liberally share it with the government, which could then use the information without meaningful oversight for purposes unrelated to cybersecurity.

CISPA creates an exception to all privacy laws to permit companies to share our information with each other and with the government in the name of cybersecurity. Although a carefully-crafted information sharing program that strictly limits the information to be shared and includes robust privacy safeguards could be an effective approach to cybersecurity, CISPA lacks such protections for individual rights. CISPA’s information sharing regime allows the transfer of vast amounts of data, including sensitive information like internet records or the content of emails, to any agency in the government including military and intelligence agencies like the National Security Agency or the Department of Defense Cyber Command. Once in government hands, this information can be used for undefined ‘national security’ purposes unrelated to cybersecurity.

Developments over the last year make CISPA’s approach even more questionable than before. First, the President recently signed Executive Order 13636, which will increase information sharing from the government to the private sector. Information sharing in this direction is often cited as a substantial justification for CISPA and will proceed without legislation. Second, the cybersecurity legislation the Senate considered last year, S. 3414, included privacy protections for information sharing that are entirely absent from CISPA, and the Obama administration, including the intelligence community, has confirmed that those protections would not inhibit cybersecurity programs. These included provisions to ensure that private companies send cyber threat information only to civilian agencies, and stricter limits on how this information may be used. Finally, witnesses at a hearing before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence confirmed only weeks ago that companies can strip out personally identifiably information that is not necessary to address cyber threats, and CISPA omits any requirement that reasonable efforts be undertaken to do so.

We continue to oppose CISPA and encourage you to vote ‘no.’ Fundamental changes to this bill are required to address the many civil liberties problems.

(Letter provided to POPVOX by Congressional office.)

Direct link to this position: https://www.popvox.com/orgs/bordc#bordc-hr-624-oppose

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Stop abuses under the PATRIOT Act

Three key provisions of the USA PATRIOT Act are set to expire at the end of February 2011. The Bill of Rights Defense Committee opposes the reauthorization of these provisions unless and until strong privacy and civil liberties safeguards are put in place. We strongly support the reintroduction of the JUSTICE Act, which would impose meaningful protections for civil liberties.

H.R. 4005 (111th): Judicious Use of Surveillance Tools In Counterterrorism Efforts Act of 2009

The JUSTICE Act was introduced in the 111th Congress by Representative Rush Holt (D-NJ12). The Bill of Rights Defense Committee strongly advocates for the reintroduction of this legislation in the 112th Congress.

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The JUSTICE Act would renew two of the three expiring PATRIOT provisions, PATRIOT sections 206 (John Doe roving wiretaps) and 215 (FISA orders for any tangible thing), but would also add strong new checks and balances to those provisions and to the PATRIOT Act in general, especially those provisions dealing with the government’s authority to issue National Security Letters. If passed, the bill would also establish critically important protections for Americans against surveillance authorized under the [FISA Amendments Act].

(This bill failed to be passed during the two-year Congress in which it was introduced.)
Direct link to this position: https://www.popvox.com/orgs/bordc#bordc-hr-4005-support
S. 289: FISA Sunsets Extension Act of 2011

Would extend expiring PATRIOT Act provisions—as well as FISA powers—until 2013.

(This bill failed to be passed during the two-year Congress in which it was introduced.)
Direct link to this position: https://www.popvox.com/orgs/bordc#bordc-s-289-oppose
S. 1686 (111th): Judicious Use of Surveillance Tools In Counterterrorism Efforts Act of 2009

The JUSTICE Act was introduced in the 111th Congress by former Senator Russ Feingold (D-WI). The Bill of Rights Defense Committee strongly advocates for the reintroduction of this legislation in the 112th Congress.

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The JUSTICE Act would renew two of the three expiring PATRIOT provisions, PATRIOT sections 206 (John Doe roving wiretaps) and 215 (FISA orders for any tangible thing), but would also add strong new checks and balances to those provisions and to the PATRIOT Act in general, especially those provisions dealing with the government’s authority to issue National Security Letters. If passed, the bill would also establish critically important protections for Americans against surveillance authorized under the [FISA Amendments Act].

(This bill failed to be passed during the two-year Congress in which it was introduced.)
Direct link to this position: https://www.popvox.com/orgs/bordc#bordc-s-1686-support
S. 290: USA PATRIOT Act Sunset Extension Act of 2011

BORDC reluctantly supports this bill, which is the best option among the PATRIOT Act reauthorization bills introduced so far.

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S. 290 would reauthorize expiring provisions until 2013 while imposing minimal safeguards to protect some civil liberties eroded by the Act's assault on the Bill of Rights.

(This bill failed to be passed during the two-year Congress in which it was introduced.)
Direct link to this position: https://www.popvox.com/orgs/bordc#bordc-s-290-neutral
S. 291: USA PATRIOT Reauthorization Act of 2011

Would permanently reauthorize all provisions of the PATRIOT Act.

(This bill failed to be passed during the two-year Congress in which it was introduced.)
Direct link to this position: https://www.popvox.com/orgs/bordc#bordc-s-291-oppose
H.R. 67: To extend expiring provisions of the USA PATRIOT Improvement and Reauthorization Act of 2005 and Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 ...

Would reauthorize expiring PATRIOT Act provisions until February 2012. Has not received support in the House.

(This bill failed to be passed during the two-year Congress in which it was introduced.)
Direct link to this position: https://www.popvox.com/orgs/bordc#bordc-hr-67-oppose
H.R. 514: FISA Sunsets Extension Act of 2011

Would reauthorize expiring PATRIOT Act provisions until December 2011. Required a 2/3 majority in order to pass without amendments, but was rejected 148-277 on February 8, 2011.

(This bill was enacted February 25, 2011.)
Direct link to this position: https://www.popvox.com/orgs/bordc#bordc-hr-514-oppose