Summary

2/14/2013--Introduced. Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 - Amends the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of "marihuana." Defines "industrial hemp" to mean the... Read More

Status

This bill was introduced on Feb 14, 2013, in a previous session of Congress, but was not passed.

Bill Text

A BILL

To amend the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of marihuana, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the ``Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013''.

SEC. 2. EXCLUSION OF INDUSTRIAL HEMP FROM DEFINITION OF MARIHUANA.

Section 102 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802) is amended-- (1) in paragraph (16)-- (A) by striking ``(16) The'' and inserting ``(16)(A) The''; and (B) by adding at the end the following: ``(B) The term `marihuana' does not include industrial hemp.''; and (2) by adding at the end the following: ``(57) The term `industrial hemp' means the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.''.

SEC. 3. INDUSTRIAL HEMP DETERMINATION BY STATES.

Section 201 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 811) is amended by adding at the end the following: ``(i) Industrial Hemp Determination.--If a person grows or processes Cannabis sativa L. for purposes of making industrial hemp in accordance with State law, the Cannabis sativa L. shall be deemed to meet the concentration limitation under section 102(57), unless the Attorney General determines that the State law is not reasonably calculated to comply with section 102(57).''. <all>

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Sentiment Map

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Nation

270 Supporting
10 Opposing
96% 4%

State: CA

14 Supporting
1 Opposing
93% 7%

District: 1st

1 Supporting
0 Opposing
100% 0%

Popularity Trend

Organizations Supporting

Vote Hemp strongly supports Sen. Wyden's Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 and its companion bill in the House, H.R. 525, which is sponsored by Rep. Massie and Rep. Schrader along with 46 bipartisan cosponsors.

Vote Hemp 1 year ago

Hemp could be legal! Ask your elected officials in Congress to support the hemp amendment to the farm bill. One of the most absurd consequences of our war on marijuana is that hemp has been caught up in the debate. Even though it contains virtually no THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, the DEA considers hemp no different than marijuana, placing it in Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act alongside heroin and LSD. As a result, it’s illegal for American farmers to grow it, and the U.S. imports millions of dollars in hemp products from countries like China. Fortunately, Senators Jeff Merkley (D-OR) and Mitch McConnell (R-KY) have teamed up to support an effort to end this senseless policy. Please contact your members of Congress and urge them to support the hemp amendment to the farm bill. Hurry, this vote could happen any day! http://www.mpp.org/our-work/federal-policy/

Organizations Opposing

No organizations opposing yet.

Users Supporting

I support S. 359: Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 because it just makes since.

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AZ
1
Anonymous1938431
AZ-1
10 months ago

I support S. 359: Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 because the bill will help farmers meet the minimum necessary living expenses of the country. Hemp will allow farmers to earn a fair living.

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TX
32
Stonewall2
TX-32
1 year ago

I support S. 359: Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 because...It's a good bill once you get past the spelling error.

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KY
6
meacara
KY-6
2 years ago

I support S. 359: Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 because it would bring much needed jobs and growth to Virginia's agriculture industry, energy efficient bio-fuel alternatives, and tax revenue. In the United States, hemp is currently scheduled as an illegal drug, yet this plant contains less than 1% of THC and is used for food products, milk, twine/rope, paper, fuel etc. in most industrialized countries! Staff members, please do some research and urge other member offices to do the same.

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VA
8
JKhan
VA-8
2 years ago

As a person who would love to get into agriculture, hemp production is an industry that our economy needs to be involved in. I support S. 359: Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 because it will help our economy flourish.

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PA
7
rcaver01
PA-7
2 years ago

I support S. 359: Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 because...Industrial hemp is a different cannabis plant. It is not "marijuana". Having it illegal makes as much sense as having poppies illegal because another type of poppy can be used to make heroin. Also, consider the fact that hemp seed, hemp cord, and other hemp products are already sold in the states. No one is trying to get high off of them (well unless they are being stupid and horsing around and I'm pretty sure it's impossible). All we are doing is pushing away economic fuel (speaking of fuel, you can make fuel from hemp at less of an impact than corn which affects the food industry) from our country and sending it to others. Personally I'm against the recreational use of marijuana. Outside of this particular bill, I would support any legalization of marijuana if it meant allowing industrial hemp production. The white house administration vetoed a petition online (on their site) to legalize industrial hemp because they see no distinction between the two plants. Industrial hemp is just that. Industrial. As a business owner who makes jewelry out of hemp cord, I'm not supporting our economy by buying hemp cord.

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OH
10
aibrean
OH-10
2 years ago

Users Opposing

No constituents opposing yet.

Bill Summary


2/14/2013--Introduced.
Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 - Amends the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of "marihuana." Defines "industrial hemp" to mean the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-nine tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis. Deems Cannabis sativa L. to meet that concentration limit if a person grows or processes it for purposes of making industrial hemp in accordance with state law, unless the Attorney General determines that the state law is not reasonably calculated to comply with such definition.

S. 358 STEM Master Teacher Corps Act of 2013 S. 360 Public Lands Service Corps Act of 2013