Summary

1/3/2013--Introduced. Disclosure of Information on Spending on Campaigns Leads to Open and Secure Elections Act of 2013 or DISCLOSE 2013 Act - Amends the Federal Election Campaign Act... Read More

Status

This bill was introduced on Jan 3, 2013, in a previous session of Congress, but was not passed.

Date Introduced
Jan 3, 2013

Co-Sponsors

d-84
r-1

Bill Text

A BILL

To amend the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 to provide for additional disclosure requirements for corporations, labor organizations, and other entities, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the ``Disclosure of Information on Spending on Campaigns Leads to Open and Secure Elections Act of 2013'' or the ``DISCLOSE 2013 Act''.

SEC. 2. CAMPAIGN DISBURSEMENT REPORTING.

(a) Information Required To Be Reported.-- (1) Treatment of functional equivalent of express advocacy as independent expenditure.--Subparagraph (A) of section 301(17) of the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (2 U.S.C. 431(17)) is amended to read as follows: ``(A) that, when taken as a whole, expressly advocates the election or defeat of a clearly identified candidate, or is the functional equivalent of express advocacy because it can be interpreted by a reasonable person only as advocating the election or defeat of a candidate, taking into account whether the communication involved mentions a candidacy, a political party, or a challenger to a candidate, or takes a position on a candidate's character, qualifications, or fitness for office; and''. (2) Expansion of period during which communications are treated as electioneering communications.--Section 304(f)(3)(A)(i) of such Act (2 U.S.C. 434(f)(3)(A)(i)) is amended-- (A) by redesignating subclause (III) as subclause (IV); and (B) by striking subclause (II) and inserting the following: ``(II) in the case of a communication which refers to a candidate...

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Sentiment Map

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Nation

122 Supporting
20 Opposing
86% 14%

State: CA

11 Supporting
2 Opposing
85% 15%

District: 1st

0 Supporting
0 Opposing
0% 0%

Popularity Trend

Organizations Supporting

No organizations supporting yet.

Organizations Opposing

No organizations opposing yet.

Users Supporting

I support The DISCLOSE Act because...I as a citizen have the right to know who is influencing my legislators.

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PA
3
LeeMarinus
PA-3
10 months ago

I support The DISCLOSE Act because it would shine a light on the billionaires and huge corporations behind toxic attack ads polluting our airwaves and reducing our voice in elections. All Congressional representatives must decide if they stand with everyday Americans whose voices are drowned out by unlimited, secret money in politics, or will they stand with the billionaires and corporations who want to buy our democracy? As we fight to create a democracy that truly works for all of us and pass a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United, the DISCLOSE Act is an important first step. It would require organizations spending money in elections to promptly disclose donors who have given $10,000 or more during an election cycle. This little bit of sunshine will allow the American people to see which corporations and big money campaign donors are spending millions to reduce our voice and rig the system against working people.

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LA
1
IrisHageney
LA-1
11 months ago

I support The DISCLOSE Act because if we're going to let capitalism override our human values, the people should at least know whose gain they're actually voting for.

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PA
5
Necrotyrannus
PA-5
11 months ago

I support The DISCLOSE Act because...I am constituent, a taxpayer, and an avid voter and I keep track of how my "representatives" vote on all issues.

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AR
3
28003
AR-3
1 year ago

I support The DISCLOSE Act because...it is Democratic!!!

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NC
11
OrganicHairDesign
NC-11
1 year ago

I support H.R. 148: DISCLOSE 2013 Act because the more transparency we can include in our electoral process the better.

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TX
4
DMforGOOOH
TX-4
2 years ago

Users Opposing

I oppose The DISCLOSE Act because I believe that the same thinking that went into the crafting of this Bill is being used by the Obama administration to illegally use the IRS, Justice Department and DHS to harass and intimidate their political opponents.

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FL
13
Jammer
FL-13
1 year ago

I oppose H.R. 148 ("To amend the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 to provide for additional disclosure requirements") because... disclosure is only a way to allow the unions to intimidate doners.

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KY
4
Anonymous306048
KY-4
2 years ago

I oppose H.R. 148 ("To amend the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 to provide for additional disclosure requirements") Voters (Any Voter!) is free to contribute to the candidate of their choice in America, which is guaranteed by the US Constitution and should not be restricted in any way, shave of form.

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LA
3
UncleBlack
LA-3
2 years ago

Bill Summary

<br /> 1/3/2013--Introduced.<br /> Disclosure of Information on Spending on Campaigns Leads to Open and Secure Elections Act of 2013 or DISCLOSE 2013 Act - Amends the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 to redefine the term "independent expenditure" as an expenditure by a person that, when taken as a whole, expressly advocates the election or defeat of a clearly identified candidate, or is the functional equivalent of express advocacy because it can be interpreted by a reasonable person only as advocating the election or defeat of a candidate, taking into account whether the communication involved mentions a candidacy, a political party, or a challenger to a candidate, or takes a position on a candidates, qualifications, or fitness for office. Expands the period during which certain communications are treated as electioneering communications. Prescribes: (1) disclosure requirements for corporations, labor organizations, and certain other entities; and (2) disclaimer requirements for campaign-related disbursements and for certain communications. Requires any communication transmitted through radio or television to include an individual or organizational disclosure statement, together with: (1) the Top Two Funders List of the persons providing the largest and second largest aggregate payments of $10,000 or more for a radio communication, and (2) the Top Five Funders List of the five persons providing the largest aggregate payments of $10,000 or more for a television communication. Repeals the prohibition against political contributions by individuals age 17 or younger. Requires a covered organization which submits regular, periodic reports to its shareholders, members, or donors on its finances or activities to include in each report, in a clear and conspicuous manner, the information included in the statements it has filed about campaign-related disbursements the organization has made during the period covered by the report. Amends the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 to require semiannual reports on certain election campaign contributions filed with the Secretary of the Senate or the Clerk of the House of Representatives by registered lobbyists (or persons or organizations required to register as lobbyists) to contain: (1) the amount of any independent expenditure of $1,000 or more made by each such person or organization, along with the name of each candidate being supported or opposed and the amount spent supporting or opposing that candidate; and (2) the amount of any electioneering communication of $1,000 or more made by such person or organization, along with the name of the candidate referred to in the communication and whether the communication involved was in support of or in opposition to the candidate. <br />

H.R. 147The Death Tax Repeal Act H.R. 149The Prioritize Spending Act