Summary

To promote prosperity, creativity, entrepreneurship, and innovation by combating the theft of U.S. property, and for other purposes. Read More

Status

This bill was introduced on Oct 26, 2011, in a previous session of Congress, but was not passed.

Bill Text

A BILL

To promote prosperity, creativity, entrepreneurship, and innovation by combating the theft of U.S. property, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

(a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``Stop Online Piracy Act''. (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents of this Act is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents. Sec. 2. Savings and severability clauses. TITLE I--COMBATING ONLINE PIRACY

Sec. 101. Definitions. Sec. 102. Action by Attorney General to protect U.S. customers and prevent U.S. support of foreign infringing sites. Sec. 103. Market-based system to protect U.S. customers and prevent U.S. funding of sites dedicated to theft of U.S. property. Sec. 104. Immunity for taking voluntary action against sites dedicated to theft of U.S. property. Sec. 105. Immunity for taking voluntary action against sites that endanger public health. Sec. 106. Guidelines and study. Sec. 107. Denying U.S. capital to notorious foreign infringers. TITLE II--ADDITIONAL ENHANCEMENTS TO COMBAT INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY THEFT

Sec. 201. Streaming of copyrighted works in violation of criminal law. Sec. 202. Trafficking in inherently dangerous goods or services. Sec. 203. Protecting U.S. businesses from foreign and economic espionage. Sec. 204. Amendments to sentencing guidelines. Sec. 205. Defending intellectual property rights abroad.

SEC. 2. SAVINGS AND SEVERABILITY CLAUSES.

(a) Savings Clauses.-- (1) First amendment.--Nothing in this Act shall be construed to impose a prior restraint on free speech or the press protected under...

Read Full Text

Sentiment Map

Select:

Nation

0 Supporting
0 Opposing
0% 0%

State: CA

0 Supporting
0 Opposing
0% 0%

District: 1st

0 Supporting
0 Opposing
0% 0%

Popularity Trend

Organizations Supporting

December 16, 2011 The House Judiciary Committee today recessed its markup of the Stop Online Piracy Act (H.R. 3261), a bill that would provide the Justice Department with major new tools to seek court orders to curb online content theft and counterfeiting by foreign rogue websites. The action came after the Committee had considered over 25 amendments to the bill, consistently voting by a 2-1 margin against measures that would have made it more difficult to combat online theft and counterfeiting. The following is a statement by Michael O’Leary, Senior Executive Vice President for Global Policy and External Affairs for the Motion Picture Association of America Inc. (MPAA). “We applaud Chairman Lamar Smith, Ranking Member John Conyers and the members of the House Judiciary Committee for taking up and showing such strong bi-partisan support for legislation to curb online content theft and counterfeiting by foreign rogue websites, which are costing hundreds of thousands of American jobs and billions in lost wages and benefits. The Chairman and the supporters of this important legislation are to be commended for continuing to work with interested parties to fashion a strong bill that has a growing base of support. The Judiciary Committee’s overwhelming support for the bill shows that the legislative process, when allowed to work, can result in strong, bi-partisan legislation that will protect millions of American jobs and creativity. It also illustrates the strong commitment in Washington to take steps to combat foreign theft of American products this Congress. Over the past two days, the Committee has carefully considered and defeated dozens of amendments that would have weakened the bill and would have made it more difficult to stop online content theft and counterfeiting. When the Committee resumes its work, we believe the bill will be approved by a strong bi-partisan margin and will be taken up by the full House and approved. It is critical that this legislation, along with the PROTECT IP Act (S. 968), which was already approved unanimously by the Senate Judiciary Committee, move forward to preserve American jobs and help grow our economy. Every day of delay means foreign criminal websites and companies profiting from these websites continue to reap financial gain at the expense of American jobs and Americans’ hard work, investment and ingenuity. Content theft is not a victimless crime. More than 2.2 million hard working, middle-class people in all 50 states depend on the entertainment industry for their jobs and many millions more work in other industries that rely on intellectual property. For all these workers and their families, online content and counterfeiting by these foreign sites mean declining incomes, lost jobs and reduced health and retirement benefits. According to the Institute for Policy Innovation, more than $58 billion is lost to the U.S. economy annually due to content theft, including more than 373,000 lost American jobs, $16 million in lost employees earnings, plus $3 billion in badly needed federal, state and local governments’ tax revenue.” http://www.mpaa.org/resources/5a0a212e-c86b-4e9a-abf1-2734a15862cd.pdf

A coalition of over 380 businesses, trade associations, and professional groups from nearly every sector of the economy in all 50 states support enhanced enforcement against rogue sites. Today, the U.S. House of Representative has responded to that call with the introduction of Stop Online Piracy Act.The U.S. Chamber of Commerce applauds the introduction of Stop Online Piracy Act that will disconnect websites dedicated to online piracy and counterfeiting from the U.S. marketplace. This legislation will provide U.S. law enforcement with refined legal tools to act against “rogue sites,” which steal American jobs, threaten consumer health and safety, and weaken the online commerce ecosystem. “Websites that blatantly steal the creativity and innovation of American industries violate a fundamental right to property,” said Thomas J. Donohue, president and CEO of the U.S. Chamber. “Operators of rogue sites threaten American jobs, endanger consumer safety, and undermine the vitality of the online marketplace. I commend Representatives Smith, Goodlatte, Conyers, and Watt for standing up to the mass theft of American intellectual property.” The bipartisan House proposal is also co-sponsored by Representatives Quayle and Berman. The Stop Online Piracy Act will disconnect websites dedicated to online piracy and counterfeiting from the U.S. marketplace. This legislation will provide U.S. law enforcement with refined legal tools to act against “rogue sites,” which steal American jobs, threaten consumer health and safety, and weaken the online commerce ecosystem. Rogue sites attract 53 billion visits per year, jeopardizing the more than $7.7 trillion of U.S. GDP and 60% of exports that the industries they steal from produce for our economy. The sweeping alliance of business and labor leaders, which represent nearly every sector of the 19 million Americans employed in IP-dependent industries, have all called for enhanced enforcement against rogue sites. “We cannot turn a blind eye to those who take advantage of U.S. innovators and chip away at the American workforce,” Donohue added. “While rogue sites pose a unique set of challenges, legislation like the Stop Online Piracy Act introduced today offer clear, tailored enforcement tools to effectively root them out. The U.S. Chamber looks forward to working with the broad coalition of businesses of every size and shape, and organized labor to support Members of the House and Senate and ensure that rogue sites legislation is enacted this year.” For more information on this legislation and the campaign against online theft, please visit www.fightonlinetheft.com. The Chamber’s Global Intellectual Property Center is working around the world to champion intellectual property (IP) rights as vital to creating jobs, saving lives, advancing global economic growth, and generating breakthrough solutions to global challenges. http://www.uschamber.com/press/releases/2011/october/us-chamber-praises-house-legislation-protect-jobs-and-sever-rogue-websit

A bill introduced today in the U.S. House of Representatives would combat online piracy with new enforcement tools and help boost America’s music industry, the National Music Publishers’ Association said today. “The Internet is an important tool which has opened opportunities for our industry from distribution to marketing to connecting with fans, but there is a segment of web operators who are criminals, pure and simple, and we must do more to stop them,” said NMPA President and CEO David Israelite. “Current laws tie the hands of both law enforcement and judicial personnel in many instances, to the detriment of American business and consumers. Legislation introduced today in the U.S. House would help fix that, enabling our justice system to go after criminal operatives. The music publishing and songwriting communities support these efforts and urge the entire House to move this important bill forward soon.” The bill, H.R. 3261 The Stop Online Piracy Act, was introduced by House Judiciary Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-TX) and multiple cosponsors. It would “promote prosperity, creativity, entrepreneurship, and innovation by combating the theft of U.S. property”. http://www.nmpa.org/media/showrelease.asp?id=203

Los Angeles (October 26, 2011) – American Federation of Musicians (AFM), American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA), Directors Guild of America (DGA), International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States, Its Territories and Canada (IATSE), International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT), and Screen Actors Guild (SAG) today released the following statement: “As the Guilds and Unions that represent more than 400,000 craftspeople, actors, technicians, directors, musicians, recording artists and others whose creativity is at the heart of the American entertainment industry, we applaud Congressman Lamar Smith (R-TX), Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, Ranking Member John Conyers (D-MI), and Congressmen Howard Berman (D-CA) and Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) along with several other Members of Congress, for introducing HR 3261, the Stop Online Piracy Act today. “This legislation, a companion bill to the PROTECT IP Act currently in the Senate, will provide U.S. law enforcement agencies with the tools to protect American intellectual property, including the films, television shows and sound recordings created by our members, from foreign rogue websites that knowingly and deliberately engage in the illegal distribution of our content for profit. “Left unchecked, these rogue websites threaten the vitality of the online marketplace by stealing the work of American innovators and undermining legitimate business. They profit by offering access to content that they had no role at all in creating or financing, and they threaten real jobs, not only for our members but for those with whom they collaborate on set and hundreds of thousands of others whose livelihoods are dependent on the economic health of our business. Without proactive measures like the STOP Online Piracy Act, rogues sites will continue to siphon away wages and benefits from members of the creative community, greatly compromising our industry’s ability to foster creativity, provide opportunities, and ensure good jobs. “We thank Chairman Smith, Ranking Member Conyers, and Congressmen Berman and Goodlatte as well as the bill’s other cosponsors for recognizing through their action today that the works created by our members - the result of talent, creativity, collaboration and years of hard work – are not only valuable contributions to our culture but are worthy of being protected from rogue sites and the profiteers who operate them. We look forward to working with Chairman Smith, the cosponsors of the bill, and the members of the House Judiciary Committee to ensure that this important legislation moves forward.” http://www.sag.org/joint-statement-sag-afm-aftra-dga-iatse-and-ibt-regarding-stop-online-piracy-act-hr-3261


IATSE
3 years ago

Provide a short explanation of your position. (Optional except when leaving a neutral statement.)

Los Angeles (October 26, 2011) – American Federation of Musicians (AFM), American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA), Directors Guild of America (DGA), International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States, Its Territories and Canada (IATSE), International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT), and Screen Actors Guild (SAG) today released the following statement: “As the Guilds and Unions that represent more than 400,000 craftspeople, actors, technicians, directors, musicians, recording artists and others whose creativity is at the heart of the American entertainment industry, we applaud Congressman Lamar Smith (R-TX), Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, Ranking Member John Conyers (D-MI), and Congressmen Howard Berman (D-CA) and Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) along with several other Members of Congress, for introducing HR 3261, the Stop Online Piracy Act today. “This legislation, a companion bill to the PROTECT IP Act currently in the Senate, will provide U.S. law enforcement agencies with the tools to protect American intellectual property, including the films, television shows and sound recordings created by our members, from foreign rogue websites that knowingly and deliberately engage in the illegal distribution of our content for profit. “Left unchecked, these rogue websites threaten the vitality of the online marketplace by stealing the work of American innovators and undermining legitimate business. They profit by offering access to content that they had no role at all in creating or financing, and they threaten real jobs, not only for our members but for those with whom they collaborate on set and hundreds of thousands of others whose livelihoods are dependent on the economic health of our business. Without proactive measures like the STOP Online Piracy Act, rogues sites will continue to siphon away wages and benefits from members of the creative community, greatly compromising our industry’s ability to foster creativity, provide opportunities, and ensure good jobs. “We thank Chairman Smith, Ranking Member Conyers, and Congressmen Berman and Goodlatte as well as the bill’s other cosponsors for recognizing through their action today that the works created by our members - the result of talent, creativity, collaboration and years of hard work – are not only valuable contributions to our culture but are worthy of being protected from rogue sites and the profiteers who operate them. We look forward to working with Chairman Smith, the cosponsors of the bill, and the members of the House Judiciary Committee to ensure that this important legislation moves forward.” http://www.sag.org/joint-statement-sag-afm-aftra-dga-iatse-and-ibt-regarding-stop-online-piracy-act-hr-3261

Show More Positions

Organizations Opposing

The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) does nothing to prevent piracy, but it does censor the internet.

testPAC 3 years ago

The free flow of information is VITAL to making the public aware of issues that could be saving their lives, and their children's lives!!!

As a web developer searching for content, worrying about being shut down without any of my entitlements from the Bill of Rights over a bunch of "1's and 0's" because a cooperation in the government's grace gets a hair across their ass is a sad, sad reality. I am sick of the legislation by our government acting in self-interest. We will soon have no freedoms left to protect.

Both SOPA and PIPA purport to stop the theft of intellectual property from foreign-based websites. While well-intentioned, the manner in which these bills attempt to achieve those goals is unworkable and includes a host of unintended and dangerous consequences. One of the main issues of SOPA and PIPA is that they force Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to block access to websites that have been accused of facilitating copyright infringement. Blocking access will likely slow down domain name resolution for the entire internet, while eroding the necessary trust the system needs. It would also set a dangerous precedent of allowing our government – and others – to filter domains. Fortunately, all sides have signaled this provision could be dropped. Further, the legislation would put a tremendous legal burden on websites accused of third-party copyright infringement and would cause them to be removed from search engines. Opponents have compared the legislation to China’s online censorship. Even if they made an honest mistake, they would be faced with litigation from the U.S. Attorney General. Fighting the accusations would cost so much time and money that smaller sites would likely go out of business fighting. Private lawsuits could also be brought against the websites. This would open up the potential for massive lawsuit abuse – even though the vast majority of online piracy occurs through a small number of websites. While the federal government does have a role in protecting intellectual property rights, it should do so in a way that does not weaken internet security, disrupt growth or restrict free speech rights. To date, SOPA and PIPA fail to meet that standard. Heritage Action opposes SOPA and PIPA and if they come to a vote will include them as a key vote on our scorecard.

Heritage Action 3 years ago

This would severely hinder our ability to do our jobs as gaming media. The possibility of legal repercussions due to us sharing media with our readers/listeners would mean us not being able to fully do our jobs.

Gameinatrix 3 years ago

PIPA and SOPA need to be stopped because they will severely hurt an industry that’s been a proven job creator. Here is how: SOPA and PIPA could force tech companies to pre-screen and monitor all user comments, pictures and videos – effectively killing social media. The legislation potentially results in mandating all Internet search engines, ISPs, social networks and any website with a hyperlink to police all links and could shut a website down that linked to any type of pirated content. Young businesses looking to develop and expand as well as smaller websites wouldn’t have the legal resources to combat the expensive litigation. Without any real process safeguards, there is great potential for abuse by rights holders. This increased risk could dramatically reduce the amount of investment in the technology sector. Because these bills give any rights holder the ability to request a site be harmed down with little or no evidence of infringement required, they stand in stark contrast with America’s history of giving due process to those whose property could be harmed. http://www.netcoalition.com/sample-page/

Net Coalition 3 years ago
Show More Positions

Users Supporting

No constiutents supporting yet.

Users Opposing

No constituents opposing yet.

Bill Summary

To promote prosperity, creativity, entrepreneurship, and innovation by combating the theft of U.S. property, and for other purposes.

H.R. 3260 Strengthening Community Safety Act of 2011 H.R. 3262 Government Results Transparency Act